Renting

How to Avoid Being Scammed on Your Next Rental

Source: Sally Mamdooh of the Denver Channel

How to Avoid Being Scammed on Your Next Rental

While browsing listing sites for a rental property to call home, Stephanie and Matthew Leschen stumbled upon a Trulia listing they thought could be the one. A man claiming to be the listing agent sent the Leschen’s a security code to the home, and they went to tour the place by themselves. Several conversations and a $3,400 later, Matthew and Stephanie found out they were the victims of a rental scam.

Unfortunately, this is not the only instance of such a scam. Watch the video below to see the rest of the Leschen’s story, and incorporate our tips for avoiding a scam into your next search for a rental home.

 

Tips for avoiding a rental scam
Do your research.

Trulia, like many apartment listing services, is widely used and trusted. However, this does not prevent scammers from posing as real estate agents. View the listing agency’s website and verify their legitimacy by searching for reviews and testimonials from other independent sources.

Beware of agents who ask for money before they show you an apartment or home.

An “admission” cost for a showing or open house should be an immediate red flag.

Meet with a landlord or listing agent in person.

A legitimate agency will always be willing to send an agent or manager out to a property to meet with you.

Beware of unusually high fees or security deposits.

Application fees are commonplace in a competitive market. However, if you are asked to pay a security deposit that is several times higher than one month’s rent, or to pay fees that seem unreasonably high, this is cause for concern. A legitimate agency will clearly explain any and all deposits and fees for you.

 

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