Affordable Housing

Former Colorado hotel converted into affordable housing for homeless

Source: Jeff Todd of CBS Denver

3737 N. Quebec St., formerly the Quality Inn & Suites, is now a 139-unit studio apartment building for people struggling with homelessness. The project utilized funding from the Denver Housing Authority’s bond program — a new partnership with the city — along with funding from other programs.

John Parvensky, the president of the Colorado Coalition for the Homeless, stated that the project’s intent is to provide access to mental health, counseling, and employment services in addition to affordable housing. Watch the news clip and read the City of Denver’s statement below!

Read Article

Rezoning deal could make way for new skyscrapers on Denver’s Sherman Street if developers agree to build affordable housing

Source: Joe Rubino of the Denver Post

Three lots on Sherman Street, east of downtown, may be getting a makeover soon! The Dikeous family, who owns the lots, is lobbying the city to rezone to allow building over 155 feet, the current view plane restriction. The Dikeous family would agree to more than half a million dollars in sidewalk and street repairs, as well as including 211 affordable housing in their projects. The buildings could be as tall as 45 stories. So far the Dikeous family has put 18 months of work and over 75 neighborhood meetings into the proposed deal.

Reporter Joe Rubino dives into the details of the proposed project, community reaction, and history of the view plane restrictions in the full article below.

Read Article

Widespread Violations Discovered in Denver Affordable Homes Program

Source: Jon Murray and Aldo Svaldi of the Denver Post

Widespread Violations Discovered in Denver Affordable Homes Program

When Denver launched it’s affordable housing program in the early 2000’s, the city took on the responsibility of keeping up with everything involved in the transaction and making sure program rules were being implemented. In other words, Denver officials took on a big role that required a team to manage. But the Great Recession happened and between 2009-2012, budget cuts resulted in over 30 Denver officials being let go. This left the affordable housing program with one staff member. With inadequate staffing to run Denver’s affordable housing initiatives, there has been a lack of oversight from the city. The result? Some homeowners of affordable housing may be forced to sell.

Read Article

Funders invest $25 million to create 700 affordable homes in metro Denver

Source: Kelcey McClung at the Denver Business Journal

 jen@loveyourhood.com 2017 Real Estate News 2017 Real Estate News  Comments Share FileEditViewInsertFormatDataToolsAdd-onsHelpAll changes saved in Drive   100%   $%123     10                      Funders invest $25 million to create 700 affordable homes in metro Denver  Screen reader support enabled.     Add 1000 more rows at bottom.  	  	MM YYYY December 2017 November 2017 1October 2017 		  Explore  Funders invest $25 million to create 700 affordable homes in metro Denver

Affordable housing options in Denver are scarce but there is a group that is doing something about it! A group of 8 funders have partnered to invest around $25 million to create over 700 affordable homes for low-income housing in the Denver area, within the next five years. Not only are they providing housing, the trust is also going to assist families in accessing early childhood education, workforce training and placement, healthcare, and wealth-building opportunities. This won’t completely solve the affordable housing problem but this is an AWESOME start!

Read Article

New Denver Affordable Housing Plan Faces Questions about How City Will Help Residents Being Pushed out

Source: Jon Murray at The Denver Post

New Denver affordable housing plan faces questions about how city will help residents being pushed out

Denver released Housing an Inclusive Denver, a 98 page draft plan that goes over how the city will bring opportunity to vulnerable neighborhoods. Rightly so, residents are questioning if this plan will help them actually stay in their home or if it will displace them somewhere else. In neighborhoods where generational and cultural roots run deep, we understand their concern. What are your thoughts?

Read Article