Investment Property

3 alternative routes to selling before you buy

Feel stuck in your current home? If you are under the impression that you need to sell and move out of it before you buy a new one, think again! You’re not alone in that impression, but the reality is that selling and moving out before you buy is not always necessary. Looking for an alternative route? Read on for three options to consider that may help you succeed with your next home purchase.

1. Sell after you buy your new home

This isn’t your average uber-expensive bridge loan that only wealthy folks can afford. There are several new home loan products out there that specialize in this niche home lending area. We’ve partnered up with one of the best new out-of-the-box-thinking lenders to help our clients buy before they sell. The “elevator pitch” for the Knock Home Swap? It allows you to buy a new home before you even list your current one for sale. Knock will provide up to a 20% down payment on your new home, six months of mortgage payments on your old home, and up to $25,000 to get your old home looking its best before it hits the market! Take a minute (86 seconds to be exact) and watch our quick video explaining the program. Have additional questions? Any of our brokers can help! We’re all Knock certified.

2. Don’t sell, and convert your current home into an investment property

Curious about investing? Why not buy a new home and own an investment property! The good news is that you’ve already got the latter. Most lenders will allow you to convert your current residence into an investment/rental property, provided the following criteria can be met:

  • A lease signed by the future tenant who will occupy the home shortly after your new home is purchased.
  • A security deposit from your new tenant, safely deposited into your bank account.
  • A small cash reserve in an account owned by you. This amount varies between lenders, from 2 to 6 months of the investment property’s mortgage payment.
  • Cash for your new home’s down payment.

Once these criteria are met, the debt magically disappears from your debt to income ratio and you qualify for the new purchase! The best part? Your new investment property keeps the same principal and interest payment you had when you lived there, you don’t have to refinance! This is a great way to diversify your retirement portfolio, generate passive income, and increase your net worth.

3. Sell before you buy, but continue living there while you search

If options one and two aren’t going to work for you, then number three has got you covered! Almost everyone who owns a home in Denver knows that it is a very competitive seller’s market right now.We all know if you submit an offer with a contingency to sell your current home, it immediately goes to the bottom of the offer pile. As part of your negotiation strategy, you should definitely employ a Post-Closing Occupancy Agreement, aka seller’s rent back. This agreement means that after you sell your current home, you become a tenant in it and you should have 60 days (or longer, depending on skillful your broker is) to find your replacement home, hopefully at no cost. If you go this route, you’ll need some tips for successfully finding and purchasing a new home in under 60 days:

  • Be aggressive. See homes as soon as they hit the market and make sure you are getting your new listings from the most reliable and up to date source.
  • Commit to one lender who will provide you a competitive rate (not the lowest) and who will be available during your search. I can’t say this enough: if the lender doesn’t give you their cell phone, don’t use them!
  • Get pre-approved! And submit all requested documentation to your lender. And yes, there is a difference between pre-approval and pre-qualification.
  • Review all of the purchase contracts and ask your questions before starting your search.
  • Research and discuss the hot market strategies with your broker before starting your search.
In conclusion…

Listing brokers who pitch their services have one goal: for you to sign that listing agreement. Remember, that isn’t always the best option for you! The current housing market can be a stressful realm for buyers, and careful consideration should be made before making a plan. Have conversations with your tax advisor, financial planner, lender, and real estate professional so that you make the best decision for you, not for a listing agent.

Real Estate Finance News Recap: January 2021

Here’s a quick digest of what happened in real estate finance last month:

+ Freddie Mac forecasts moderate house price growth of 0.7-1.3% in 2021-2022 with mortgage rates expected to average around 2.9% until year-end.

+ The difference between second homes and investment properties is important when it comes to financing. Sarah Kuta of Realtor.com explains why it matters and how to keep yourself aboveboard.

 

Have questions about what’s happening in real estate in your neighborhood? Let’s chat!

Interested in the Denver real estate market? Subscribe to our weekly emails to get more information like this.

Subscribe

Rules for Buying a New Primary Residence without Selling Your Current Home

By guest author: Christian Durland of Homeowner’s Blueprint

Here in Denver, Colorado, things have been quite exciting in the local world of Real Estate.  While many other parts of the country are still struggling in terms of foreclosures and short-sales, and an over saturated Real Estate market, here in Denver, we’re actually enjoying some home appreciation with certain pockets of the Metro area going up into double digit appreciation rates over the last year, along with home inventories (homes currently being offered for sale) being at a 23 year low.

Buying a Second Home without Selling Your First

With all this positive news, many are now thinking that this maybe the right time to dive into Real Estate and purchase a new home, but many of those who are making this decision must also sell their current home before purchasing a new home, which is still (even though the market has “healed” quite a bit) not as easy as it once was before “mortgage meltdown” and the subsequent housing crisis of 2007-2010.  Then there will be those, who will opt to retain their current home and convert it into a rental property, either by necessity, or because they choose to, however this transition may not be as simple as one might think either. (more…)