RiNo

Denver Real Estate News Recap: August 2021

Here’s a quick digest of what happened in Denver real estate last month:

+ Downtown Denver has been starving for new condos over the last decade. Its hunger pains will begin to subside when the the largest condo project since 2009 breaks ground soon at 18th & Glenarm.

+ Median home prices fell for a second month in August. Buyers, don’t be relieved yet — inventory is tightening again, as active listings fell 11.7% between July and August.

+ Relief for Denver renters has dissipated in the Denver metro area. Front Range rents increased 14.4% year-over-year in August and are up 12.8% since March 2020.

+ A San Francisco-based developer has purchased an entire block of RiNo for $27.5M. Plans are still in the early stages, but may include a 500-unit apartment project, stretching 12-stories.

 


 

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Cushman & Wakefield says, ‘Denver is just freaking hip’

Source: Cushman & Wakefield

It’s official: Denver is cool. We already knew this, but now we have a report to back it up. While other cities have one or two “cool streets”, this report has dubbed the entire downtown Denver area as one big “cool street.” We have our creative employment, tech-driven market, and urban revitalization to thank for this! Here are a few details on two of the featured Denver “cool street” areas:

Highland

The Highland neighborhood is chock full of cool streets. While it’s one of Denver’s oldest neighborhoods, it’s been an area of recent (and many) revitalizations.

Find homes for sale in Highland.

RiNo Arts District

The RiNo Arts District was once an industrial neighborhood. As creatives have flocked to the area, it has transformed from warehouses and factories to breweries, galleries, and restaurants as far as the eye can see. The district spreads into three neighborhoods; all which are seeing major transformations and growth.

Find homes for sale around the RiNo Art district in: Five Points, Elyria-Swansea, and Globeville.

Download the free report to see what other Denver hoods were featured!

Download the 2019 Cool Streets Report

See the Interactive Map

Denver’s Cole, RiNo neighborhoods set for dramatic redevelopment

Source: Matt Mauro of Fox 31 Denver

New projects, like the in-progress Denver Rock Drill renovation, are reshaping the city’s Northeast corridor. RiNo residents Kerry and Jay, interviewed by Fox 31, are excited for the change, but don’t love the construction. Cole and RiNo locals who tough out the noise and debris of redevelopment will be rewarded with more green space and exciting new neighborhood restaurants and bars. Watch and read the full story below.

Article and Video

Nearly two years in the making, Brighton Boulevard makeover expected to supercharge RiNo growth

Source: Joe Rubino of the Denver Post
Photo credit: Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

In the late 1940’s, Harold Hill opened his farm machinery business at 3100 Brighton Boulevard. At this time, the street was a dusty two-lane strip with warehouses and a foundry. The business is now Do-It-Ur-Self Plumbing & Heating Supply, owned by Harold’s grandson, Rick Hill. Over that time, Rick has seen the neighborhood transform from an industrial park to a vibrant hub of business, culture, and art. 

On Brighton between 30th and 38th streets more than $55.8 million in commercial construction has been permitted. Hill calls Brighton: “one huge craps table.” While the city boasts the public infrastructure investment as kickstarting the surge of private investment, local developers Mickey and Kyle Zeppelin mention it was actually the private investment and the formation of the RiNo Arts District that attracted visitors to the district. Eventually, backing from the City of Denver followed. Overall, this largely collaborative effort between the City and local business owners has created a corridor that is easily accessible while holding true to it’s uniquely industrial roots.

A brief timeline:

Late 1940’s: Harold Hill opened farm machinery business at 3100 Brighton Boulevard

2000: Zeppelin Development company buys the former cab company hub just off Brighton and begins to lobby the city for Brighton Boulevard improvements. The Taxi Community has been growing constantly since

2003: The City of Denver creates its River North Plan, a vision for the RiNo Art District

2013: The Source market hall, the first business of its kind, opens at 3550 Brighton Blvd. in the aforementioned foundry 

2016: Brighton Boulevard is still a two lane street with no curbs, drainage, limited sidewalks

October 2016: Brighton Boulevard construction begins

Spring 2018: Phase 1 of construction, between 29th and 40th Street to be completed. The cost of the redevelopment is $41 million. The RiNo Art District neighborhood advocacy organization estimates at least $85 million in private projects have gone up in the surrounding area

The three years of road construction have come with several challenges. The largest of which being reduced accessibility due to construction, which has driven traffic away from RiNo. Rebel Restaurant, a block from Brighton and 38th Street has announced it will close. Comida, a beloved tenant of The Source and Love Your Hood, has seen its business fall by $800,000 from October 2016-2017.

Josh Peebles, President of RiNo branch of Collegiate Peaks Bank, believes the public improvements will open the door to larger entities bringing their business to the neighborhood. Collegiate Peaks has financed more than $100 million in RiNo projects.

With the combination of local government and business support, Hill’s “craps table” has become one of the most promising of Denver’s many growing neighborhoods.

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