What buying a home will actually cost you

What buying a home will actually cost you

Everyone knows that buying a home costs money. But how much exactly? While the purchase price of the home makes up the largest component, here are other costs homebuyers should be prepared to pay:

Earnest Money

This is essentially a down payment or deposit on your new home! It shows the seller that you are a serious buyer by putting some skin in the game, so to speak. Should you terminate your contract in good faith, you will get that money back. And should you make it to the closing table, the money will go towards your down payment. Earnest Money will typically be between 1%-3% of your purchase price, so make sure you have the funds readily available once you start writing offers!

Home Inspection

This is the time to have a home’s nooks, crannies, roof, sewer, and so on inspected by a qualified home inspector. Home inspection pricing can vary from company to company, but you can typically plan for $300- $1,000 depending on the types of inspections you order (sewer, radon test, general inspection, etc.).

Appraisal

If you’re like 87% of buyers that are financing their home purchase with a mortgage, your lender will need an appraisal (Property Valuation) done on the home. This ensures that they are not loaning you more money than the house is worth. Price can vary depending on the company, but you can typically plan for $500-$750 for the appraisal report.

Down Payment

The amount of a down payment typically starts around 3% of the purchase price and goes as high as you are comfortable spending or can afford. Twenty percent down is the sweet spot, where you’re no longer required to pay Private Mortgage Insurance (at less than 20% down, you’ll pay for this). You’ll want to discuss your down payment options with your lender!

Closing Costs and Prepaids

The majority of your closing costs are charged by your lender for the financing of your new home. Every lender packages their fees differently, so be sure to have them explain every charge in detail to ensure you are comfortable with them. There will be prepaid items that will be required to set up your escrow account (three months of insurance and taxes), so that the account will be solvent to pay the first bills when they arrive to the escrow servicing company.

And Of Course, Commission

Your real estate broker should disclose their commission amount and how it is paid before you submit any offers. In Colorado, it’s pretty common for the listing broker to negotiate a commission with the seller, and then advertise a co-op fee to pay the buyer’s broker’s commission. In those instances, the amount you go under contract for is the amount you pay at the closing table. Your broker’s hard work will be rewarded from the closing proceeds and reduce the amount paid to the seller.

Budgeting for closing costs is an important part of your home purchasing game plan. Unanticipated expenses right before closing is never a fun problem to deal with!

Looking for more info about buying or selling a home? Please reach out, and subscribe to our weekly emails to never miss a beat about Denver real estate.

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